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19
Mar

ppt_slide97

by Brent Dykes

If you work at a company with more than 100 people, you probably have an official corporate PowerPoint template. If you work in a company with more than 1,000 people, you probably don’t know the designer who created your presentation template. There’s a good chance that the graphic designer who created your PowerPoint template doesn’t use PowerPoint on a regular basis — in fact, they probably detest PowerPoint and never touch the presentation software other than to make sure the template looks okay every time the corporate branding is updated.

Does anyone see a problem here? It’s like a Mormon making your coffee or a vegan preparing your hamburger. Too many companies have templates that may look professional aesthetically but are basically impractical for daily use or have bad practices embedded right in them. I’m sure the designers put a lot of thought into the look-and-feel of the PowerPoint templates, but I don’t believe they ever considered doing any usability testing on their actual template designs. That’s too bad because all of their company’s PowerPoint users end up suffering. It forces people like me — who use PowerPoint on a daily and weekly basis — to modify the corporate templates to make them more practical and effective at communicating.

Most of the changes I make to the presentation templates are usually subtle in visual terms, but can save major headaches during the creation and presentation phases. However, most PowerPoint users won’t know how to fix their corporate templates, aren’t going to take matters into their own hands, and are essentially stuck with an impractical or ineffective presentation template.

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12
Mar

by Ginny Soskey

ppt_slide98

Remember your last marketing team meeting? That one person spoke to your team and just started throwing data at you from your monthly marketing reporting deck. No context — just numbers, graphs, and the occasional pop of color. Instead of intriguing you, he or she put you to sleep — it was really hard to stay awake when someone was just throwing data at you.

You don’t want to be that person.

Instead, you want to be the one who uses data to tell a story in your monthly marketing reporting. The one that uses data to prove an argument. The one that makes data easy to understand. The one your boss notices for using data smartly.

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10
Mar

By Michel Theriault

ppt_slide96

Delivering effective and powerful presentations is critical to business success. It’s about making an impact that influences your audience, whether you are an entrepreneur pitching investors, a small business owner pitching a product to a retailer or potential customer, a startup presenting a new initiative, or a manager asking for budget or staffing resources.

Here are five principles you must use to create powerful PowerPoint presentations:

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25
Feb

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12
Feb

by Don Tennant

ppt_slide73

Some would have us believe that PowerPoint is inherently dangerous. No doubt, they make a compelling argument. One need not witness the lifelessness of  more than a handful of moribund meetings, conferences, or classes where PowerPoint is being wielded to recognize that the threat of slaughtered interest and engagement is all too real.

What we need to keep in mind, however, is that it’s only when PowerPoint falls into the wrong hands that it becomes menacing. True, when that happens, the little clicker thing that advances the slides can become a weapon of mass monotony. But when used properly, it can advance engagement, understanding, and knowledge with every click.

In order to gain some insight into the proper handling of PowerPoint, I turned to Vikas Jhingran, a world champion public speaker and author of the book, “Emote: Using Emotions to Make Your Message Memorable.” Jhingran devoted an entire chapter of his book to the topic of how to present with PowerPoint, so I asked him what the keys are to an effective PowerPoint presentation. He explained the two main problems with PowerPoint:

The first is that PowerPoint, in general, is a very difficult tool to engage with emotionally. A lot of people don’t understand that, and therefore lose their audience. So you have to understand that the emotional connection they can have is with you, and then PowerPoint would be an aid that helps in that emotional dialogue. If you make PowerPoint the center of your presentation, then that emotional connection is lost. That is the key reason why we have so many PowerPoint presentations that fail to engage the audience, and fail to be effective.

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05
Feb

By Bronwen

The right picture can really make your PowerPoint presentation pop. Not only can it help you illustrate your point—it can also help you connect with the audience, and maybe even stir an emotional response.

hawaii_versus

(Who wants to go to Hawaii now?)

What’s the best place to find free, high-quality images like the photo above? There are lots of great resources, both on the web and in PowerPoint itself. These resources make it possible to create vibrant, professional-looking presentations, even if you aren’t an experienced graphic designer.

Below are some of our favorite sources for stock photos and other free graphics.

Happy image hunting!

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03
Feb
ppt_slide67
By Ellen Finkelstein

When I work with clients in 1-on-1 coaching, I use webinar software so we can work together on a presentation. Sometimes I wield the mouse and sometimes my client does.  Because I work in PowerPoint so much, I use the fastest way possible — at least as far as I know. But when my clients take over, I often see them use slower ways of accomplishing a task.

So, here are my best tips for working faster in PowerPoint.

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31
Jan

By Tara Duggan,

1 Open a new PowerPoint presentation and right-click on the first slide. Select the “Layout” option and click the “Blank” slide option.

2 Click the “Shapes” button from the “Insert” menu and select the “Rectangle” option. Draw a rectangle in the center of the slide. Right-click on the object. Select the “Format Shape” option and choose a color, such as yellow. Click in the center of the rectangle and type the highest number of your countdown, for example, 10. Add the text “Minutes Remaining” or similar directive.

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30
Jan

By Jeff Hurt

Presentations are the business currency of today. PowerPoint® is often the legal tender of those presentations. We trade and share PowerPoint presentations like baseball cards, stamps and money.

SlideShare is the largest online community for sharing great presentations! When you create a presentation using great design and learning principles, and you upload it to SlideShare, your presentation may just jump to their home page for thousands to see!

Viewing a presentation without PowerPoint (Keynote or Prezi) is like listening to a TV show over the radio. We expect and want the visual to help keep us focused.

PowerPoint is nearly unavoidable. However, misuse of PowerPoint is avoidable!

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28
Jan

By Gcfelizabeth

Have you ever given a PowerPoint presentation and noticed that something about it just seemed a little… off? If you’re unfamiliar with basic PowerPoint design principles, it can be hard to create a slide show that presents your information in the best light. Poorly designed presentations can leave an audience feeling confused, bored, and even irritated. Review these Do’s and Don’ts for tips on making your next presentation more engaging.

  • Don’t read your presentation straight from the slides. If your audience can both read and hear, it’s a waste of time for you to simply read your slides aloud. Your audience will zone out and stop listening to what you’re saying, which means they won’t hear any extra information you include. Instead of typing out your entire presentation, include only main ideas, keywords, and talking points in your slide show text. Engage your audience by sharing the details out loud.
  • Do Follow the 5/5/5 rule. To keep your audience from feeling overwhelmed, you should keep the text on each slide short and to the point. Some experts suggest using the 5/5/5 rule: no more than five words per line of text, five lines of text per slide, or five text-heavy slides in a row.

textweb

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