Posts tagged "ForPowerPoint"

Does Your Client Need to Know You’re Using PowerPoint?

by Tom Kuhlmann

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - branding requirements for elearning & PowerPoint

Many organizations have rules on using PowerPoint. But there’s a difference between elearning courses and slide presentations. How you use PowerPoint and its features is different; and so is the output. The only thing that’s the same is the application. However, it never fails that once someone knows you’re using PowerPoint to build the rapid elearning course, they apply the same rules to your elearning course that they’d apply to presentations. And that causes issues.

Structure Your Presentation Like a Story

by Nancy Duarte After studying hundreds of speeches, I’ve found that the most effective presenters use the same techniques as great storytellers: By reminding people of the status quo and then revealing the path to a better way, they set up a conflict that needs to be resolved. That tension helps them persuade the audience to adopt a new mindset or behave differently — to move from what is to what could be. And by following Aristotle’s three-part story structure (beginning, middle, end), they create a message that’s easy to digest, remember, and retell. Here’s how it looks when you chart it out:

Duarte 4-1.jpg

Why Audiences Detest Presenters That Abuse or Avoid PowerPoint

By Jeff Hurt Presentations are the business currency of today. PowerPoint® is often the legal tender of those presentations. We trade and share PowerPoint presentations like baseball cards, stamps and money. Audiences Fed Up! Author and consultant Dave Paradi has researched what audiences dislike about PowerPoint presentations since 2003. Results from his recent September 2011 survey highlight what many conference attendees already know. “Audiences are fed up with presenters who fill their slides with too much content and are then compelled to read it all to those seated in the room. …Too many presentations suffer from information overload.” ~ Dave Paradi

How to insert sound into PowerPoint?

  You can add sound files to your presentations from a variety of sources. For example, you can add sound files you download from the Internet or special sound effects CDs. However, PowerPoint does not recognize all sound file types. WAV and MIDI are two of the types it does recognize. PowerPoint also lets you attach sounds to different objects on a slide. However, the objects must be animated before you can attach a sound file to them. Adding sound from a file

  1. If you wish to use a new sound, make sure you download and save the file on your computer, preferably in the same folder with your PowerPoint presentation.
  2. Click on Insert menu < Movies and Sounds < Sound from File
  3. In the Look in drop-down menu, specify the drive and folder where the sound file is located.
  4. In the file list, click the sound file you want, then click OK.
  5. PowerPoint may ask you whether you want the sound to play automatically or on mouse-click. If you choose mouse click, you will need to click the icon during the presentation to start it playing.

Add Slide Numbers to PowerPoint 2010 Slides

By Wendy Russell

Slide Numbers are Added to the Footer of the PowerPoint 2010 Presentation
Click on the Slide Numbers button on the Insert tab of the PowerPoint 2010 ribbon Click on the Slide Numbers button on the Insert tab of the PowerPoint 2010 ribbon Add Slide Numbers in PowerPoint 2010 It is an easy task to let PowerPoint add the slide numbers automatically to your slides.
  1. Click on the Insert tab of the ribbon.
  2. Click on the Slide Number button, located in the Text section of the ribbon.
  3. The Header and Footer dialog box opens.