Category PowerPoint Tips 43 articles to read

Why Audiences Detest Presenters That Abuse or Avoid PowerPoint

By Jeff Hurt Presentations are the business currency of today. PowerPoint® is often the legal tender of those presentations. We trade and share PowerPoint presentations like baseball cards, stamps and money. SlideShare is the largest online community for sharing great presentations! When you create a presentation using great design and learning principles, and you upload it to SlideShare, your presentation may just jump to their home page for thousands to see! Viewing a presentation without PowerPoint (Keynote or Prezi) is like listening to a TV show over the radio. We expect and want the visual to help keep us focused. PowerPoint is nearly unavoidable. However, misuse of PowerPoint is avoidable!

Simple Do’s and Don’ts for Better PowerPoint Presentations

By Gcfelizabeth Have you ever given a PowerPoint presentation and noticed that something about it just seemed a little… off? If you’re unfamiliar with basic PowerPoint design principles, it can be hard to create a slide show that presents your information in the best light. Poorly designed presentations can leave an audience feeling confused, bored, and even irritated. Review these Do’s and Don’ts for tips on making your next presentation more engaging.

  • Don’t read your presentation straight from the slides. If your audience can both read and hear, it’s a waste of time for you to simply read your slides aloud. Your audience will zone out and stop listening to what you’re saying, which means they won’t hear any extra information you include. Instead of typing out your entire presentation, include only main ideas, keywords, and talking points in your slide show text. Engage your audience by sharing the details out loud.
  • Do Follow the 5/5/5 rule. To keep your audience from feeling overwhelmed, you should keep the text on each slide short and to the point. Some experts suggest using the 5/5/5 rule: no more than five words per line of text, five lines of text per slide, or five text-heavy slides in a row.
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Teaching with PowerPoint

PowerPoint can be an effective tool to present material in the classroom and encourage student learning. PowerPoint, when effectively planned and used, can enhance instruction. People are divided on the effectiveness of this ubiquitous software—some say that PowerPoint is wonderful while others bemoan its pervasiveness. No matter which side you take, there are effective ways to use PowerPoint which can be used to enhance instruction. This section is organized in three major sections: Part one will help faculty identify and use basic but important design elements; Part two will cover ways to enhance teaching and learning with PowerPoint; Part three will list ways to engage students with PowerPoint. PowerPoint can be an effective tool to present material in the classroom and encourage student learning. PowerPoint can be used to project visuals which would otherwise be difficult to bring to class. For example, in an anthropology class, a single PowerPoint presentation could project images of an anthropological dig from a remote area, questions which ask students about the topic, a chart of related statistics, and a mini quiz about what was just discussed that provides students with information that is visual, challenging and engaging. This article will highlight ways to design effective PowerPoint presentations as well as show best practice when using this powerful software.

Structure Your Presentation Like a Story

by Nancy Duarte After studying hundreds of speeches, I’ve found that the most effective presenters use the same techniques as great storytellers: By reminding people of the status quo and then revealing the path to a better way, they set up a conflict that needs to be resolved. That tension helps them persuade the audience to adopt a new mindset or behave differently — to move from what is to what could be. And by following Aristotle’s three-part story structure (beginning, middle, end), they create a message that’s easy to digest, remember, and retell. Here’s how it looks when you chart it out:

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Why Audiences Detest Presenters That Abuse or Avoid PowerPoint

By Jeff Hurt Presentations are the business currency of today. PowerPoint® is often the legal tender of those presentations. We trade and share PowerPoint presentations like baseball cards, stamps and money. Audiences Fed Up! Author and consultant Dave Paradi has researched what audiences dislike about PowerPoint presentations since 2003. Results from his recent September 2011 survey highlight what many conference attendees already know. “Audiences are fed up with presenters who fill their slides with too much content and are then compelled to read it all to those seated in the room. …Too many presentations suffer from information overload.” ~ Dave Paradi

Using Your Tablet in the Classroom: An App Summary

by Angel Brady We just recently gave a talk about using tablets in the classroom for a Lunch and Learn session here at Princeton. The focus was to address how an instructor can not only use their tablet device for their personal life, but cross over and use the same device in the classroom to teach. Tablets are becoming more and more popular with instructors and they are opting for them instead of carrying a laptop around. Once instructors get use to using the iPad or any tablet device for their daily personal tasks, it only makes sense that instructors would want to start venturing into use the tablet device for lecture and course work. Worldwide media tablet sales to end users are forecast to total 118.9 million units in 2012, a 98 percent increase from 2011 sales of 60 million units, according to Gartner, Inc. Tablet use in the classroom also goes in the vein of the BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) movement which we have been seeing for years with students and instructors bringing their own laptops to class. Below we have a summary of apps we tested (mostly iPad but a few can be found in the Google Play Store). We have also categorized them by topic. They are listed below:

Powerpoint for Mac 2011: Play audio across slides

By Wayne Dixon I was asked a question via email by a Macgasm reader on how to play an audio clip across a set of slides within PowerPoint for Mac 2011. I knew it was possible, since I’ve done the same thing under Office 2007 on the PC. So, I set out to investigate, and I thought I would share my findings. It’s actually quite simple if you want to play an audio track across an entire slideshow.

  1. Click on Insert -> Audio -> Audio Browser (or Audio from File).
  2. Select which audio track you want to play.
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How to insert sound into PowerPoint?

  You can add sound files to your presentations from a variety of sources. For example, you can add sound files you download from the Internet or special sound effects CDs. However, PowerPoint does not recognize all sound file types. WAV and MIDI are two of the types it does recognize. PowerPoint also lets you attach sounds to different objects on a slide. However, the objects must be animated before you can attach a sound file to them. Adding sound from a file

  1. If you wish to use a new sound, make sure you download and save the file on your computer, preferably in the same folder with your PowerPoint presentation.
  2. Click on Insert menu < Movies and Sounds < Sound from File
  3. In the Look in drop-down menu, specify the drive and folder where the sound file is located.
  4. In the file list, click the sound file you want, then click OK.
  5. PowerPoint may ask you whether you want the sound to play automatically or on mouse-click. If you choose mouse click, you will need to click the icon during the presentation to start it playing.

Make a presentation slideshow using InDesign

By Boris Hoekmeijer   For creating digital presentations, the vast majority of people use Microsoft’s PowerPoint. It’s quite simple to work with, and does the job quite well. But if you’re a designer, you like to have more freedom of choice when it comes to the layout. In that case, you’re better off with Adobe’s InDesign. It has a million possibilities, especially when it comes to styling typography. However, the world can’t read INDD files, or view them as presentations. So how do you create a presentation from your InDesign file?