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09
Jun

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Adriaan Bloem

Adriaan BloemSr Mgr Online at MBC

  • Use large fonts. The beamer will probably have a low resolution (you might still come across a 800×600!) and people need to read at a glance. 30 points minimum.
  • Don’t use Serif fonts. (Like Times: the fonts with the small hooks at the ends.) They were designed for legibility and space saving in print. Print is very high resolution, you want to save paper and ink because they cost money. In PowerPoint, paper and ink are free: go for a Sans Serif!
  • To sum it up: 30 points or larger Sans Serif. E.g., Helvetica, Arial, Verdana, Lucida.

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…but sometimes, to make an impact, you have to break the rules. Sometimes, much larger, frivolous or very stern fonts can set the tone. Just be very sure why you would break the rules, understand the drawbacks, and please… don’t ever use more than two different fonts!

I have seen presentations in Courier and Mistral where it worked very well. Usually, though, it’s a terrible idea.

If your bullets don’t fit with the 30 point minimum, by the way, that’s a major clue there’s too much text on your slide.

07
Apr

This is a guest post from Stacy Ennis. Stacy is a book and magazine editor, writer, book coach, and speaker, as well as the author of The Editor’s Eye: A Practical Guide to Transforming Your Book from Good to Great. She works with a wide range of clients, from celebrities and corporate clients to independent authors and small book presses and also ghostwrites magazine articles, web content, and books, often reaching national and international audiences.

Public speaking and writing seem opposite of one another, yet both are necessary to become a successful author. Nancy Buffington is a public speaking coach who helps authors improve their presence in front of audiences. Here is an interview with Nancy.

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Stacy: Why are public speaking skills important for authors?

Nancy: These days, you can’t afford to be a shy, retiring writer scribbling in the attic. Just to get published, you need to show that you’re willing and more than able to pull off signings, readings, radio and TV interviews. Basically, to be a successful author these days, you need to play a central part on your publicity team.

Stacy: Are there any shared qualities between being a good writer and a good speaker?

Nancy: In both cases, you’re trying to connect with an audience—but when you’re writing, you don’t actually see that audience in front of you. Speaking can make you a much better writer—you get instant feedback from a range of real, live audience members, and you have to be clear (no chance for a live audience to thumb back a few pages if they get lost). Likewise, writing well can make you a better speaker, with a clearer sense of purpose, ideas explored in depth, vivid storytelling, and a structure that really works.

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31
Mar

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by  Lisa Braithwaite

One cause of speaking anxiety is the feeling (and self-directed pressure) of having to impress the audience.

Maybe this occurs to you while you’re writing, and you start inserting big, formal or flowery (aka “speechy“) words you normally wouldn’t say, but that make you sound smart or important.

Or you’re on stage and — suddenly — it occurs to you that your normal words, actions and movements aren’t good enough.

Suddenly, you don’t know what to do with your hands, even though you were just having a conversation off stage and your hands were fine.

Suddenly, everything is wrong with you. Your clothes aren’t right, your voice isn’t right, your humor isn’t funny enough.

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25
Sep

by Lei Han
My husband shared this video with me and I laughed out loud – “Life after Death by Powerpoint” by Don McMillan. Within 4 minutes, Don talked about some of the most common mistakes we make with our PowerPoint presentations. Here are my favorites.

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21
Apr

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By Ellen Finkelstein

If you’re a trainer or teacher, the title of this blog post is an obvious statement for you.

But if you do more persuasive presentations, it may not be obvious.

All training involves persuasion; my trainer clients taught me that, telling me in no uncertain terms that they need to persuade their trainees to pay attention and implement their training.

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25
Mar

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By Priyanka Pereira

Over the last few years, I have seen 3D humanoid vectors being increasingly used in eLearning courses. While I initially thought they were unrealistic, like cartoons, and hence immature and unprofessional, I have now started including them on a regular basis in my storyboards.

So what did it take to convert me?

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10
Mar

By Michel Theriault

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Delivering effective and powerful presentations is critical to business success. It’s about making an impact that influences your audience, whether you are an entrepreneur pitching investors, a small business owner pitching a product to a retailer or potential customer, a startup presenting a new initiative, or a manager asking for budget or staffing resources.

Here are five principles you must use to create powerful PowerPoint presentations:

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27
Feb

By Geetesh Bajaj

Explore various options within the text floatie in Office 2013 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint) on a touch device such as Microsoft Surface.

 

On a touch device such as Micosoft’s Surface tablets, you may not have access to a regular keyboard and mouse. Everything happens with a tap or a slide or some other gesture. To adapt an existing program such as Word, Excel, or PowerPoint for a touch environment is no easy task — however Microsoft has made this happen — and it has happened so well! Unlike the desktop versions of Office programs, the touch versions have a floatie — this is a floating toolbar that contains options that are relevant to the tapped object.

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11
Feb

By Simon

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Before you start, you should know that this is part of a paired blog, with my friend Lydia Bates, who’s just done her first Ignite presentation and who’s blogged about her first time. This blog is my take on it, as a professional trainer and speaker.

My position is pretty simple.

I hate Ignite as a presentation format….  :)

Well, okay, I don’t hate it – it’s got a lot of good stuff going for it, but hear me out…

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05
Feb

By Bronwen

The right picture can really make your PowerPoint presentation pop. Not only can it help you illustrate your point—it can also help you connect with the audience, and maybe even stir an emotional response.

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(Who wants to go to Hawaii now?)

What’s the best place to find free, high-quality images like the photo above? There are lots of great resources, both on the web and in PowerPoint itself. These resources make it possible to create vibrant, professional-looking presentations, even if you aren’t an experienced graphic designer.

Below are some of our favorite sources for stock photos and other free graphics.

Happy image hunting!

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