hcg
25
Feb

3379

SlideGenius

As all professionals have figured out, the most effective PowerPoint slides are never the ones that contain a smorgasbord of data and information. In fact, the only time slides like these are effective is if you want to put your audience to sleep. The best PowerPoint slides help the presenter tackle a topic with memorable and arresting visuals.

In other words, effective PowerPoint slides should only act as visual aids that help enhance a presenter’s discussion. A PowerPoint presentation isn’t there to act as your script or teleprompter, from which you can simply echo every bit of information flashed on screen. It’s there to make sure your discussion is accessible and easy to understand by turning key points into interesting visuals. Unfortunately, not all presenters have mastered this distinction.

If your presentations are always burdened by text-heavy PowerPoint slides, it’s time to dial back and strip your deck bare. Try the following suggestions to make sure you don’t have walls of text blocking the audience’s interest in your discussion:

Strip your content down to its essentials
Learning to cut back text-heavy PowerPoint slides will really rely on your ability to edit your own content. Before you start making your PowerPoint deck, review the draft you’ve prepared and see how you can simplify your points even more. Your goal is to strip down your content to the bare minimum.

You don’t have to waste space on your slides to elaborate particulars. Your slides are there to highlight the main points and takeaways. Every thing else that needs to be discussed or described is for the presenter to do on his own. Learn more about how you can properly edit your presentation content here.

Read the rest of this entry »

16
Feb

11765

By Tatiana Estévez

Bullet points are lists of items or short statement points. They are not supposed to be full sentences, at least not when used in PowerPoint. The traditional style of formatting bullet points is to finish each line item with a comma or hyphen, and the last bullet to have a full stop.

My favourite things to do on Quora are:

  • Answering questions;
  • Discussing answers in comments;
  • Writing blog posts; and
  • Collapsing joke answers.

This is considered a bit old fashioned and many companies prefer the style of ‘open punctuation’ for PowerPoint slides. I wouldn’t allow the above in my documents and will take it out if someone tries to do this.

Generally there is no real rule and you can write the above either with full stops or without as long it is consistent:

Oxford Dictionaries says:

Bullet points are used to draw attention to important information within a document so that a reader can identify the key issues and facts quickly. There are no fixed rules about how to use them, but here are some guidelines.

Source: http://www.oxforddictionaries.co…

Read the rest of this entry »

25
Sep

by Lei Han
My husband shared this video with me and I laughed out loud – “Life after Death by Powerpoint” by Don McMillan. Within 4 minutes, Don talked about some of the most common mistakes we make with our PowerPoint presentations. Here are my favorites.

Read the rest of this entry »

23
Jun

ppt_slide1

1. 15 seconds—the amount of time you have to make a positive first impression on your audience.

From the moment you step on stage, your audience will make an assessment of you and then look for evidence to confirm their first impressions. This subconscious phenomena is called thin slicing – and we all do it.  Research shows that the first fifteen seconds of a presentation are the most important because 90% of your audience’s initial judgments remain the same even after you’ve given your presentation.  Knowing this, you want to do everything in your power to make a positive first impression to ensure that initial judgment swing in your favor. How? Dress for success, be prepared, know your audience and don’t forget to smile.

Read the rest of this entry »

05
Jun

by PoweredTemplate

Today you have made your mind to impress sophisticated audience giving a knockout presentation. You have spent the night drafting cute wording and selecting your best slides. Now take your time and think: is your presentation really intended for your listeners or it’s just a set of slides? We often use PowerPoint to inform, to persuade, sometimes to provoke. But there can be no better way to absolutely lose the support of your audience than to irritate them. So, how to avoid such a mistake? Let’s ask ourselves a simple question: what drives us nuts when we watch someone giving a presentation?

Read the rest of this entry »

27
May

ppt_slide27

by Garr Reynolds

1. Keep it Simple

 

des-1PowerPoint uses slides with a horizontal or “Landscape” orientation. The software was designed as a convenient way to display graphical information that would support the speaker and supplement the presentation. The slides themselves were never meant to be the “star of the show” (the star, of course, is your audience). People came to hear you and be moved or informed (or both) by you and your message. Don’t let your message and your ability to tell a story get derailed by slides that are unnecessarily complicated, busy, or full of what Edward Tufte calls “chart junk.” Nothing in your slide should be superfluous, ever.

Your slides should have plenty of “white space” or “negative space.” Do not feel compelled to fill empty areas on your slide with your logo or other unnecessary graphics or text boxes that do not contribute to better understanding. The less clutter you have on your slide, the more powerful your visual message will become.

Read the rest of this entry »

19
May

ppt_slide62

1         Before You Plan The Fun, Plan The Basics.
  • As obvious as this might sound, caring about your presentation topic is important. Be sure that you understand why you are presenting, and what you want to be achieved at the end.
  • Ask yourself the important questions to help you understand. Why is this presentation important? What are you going to tell your audience that they don’t already know? If you were in the audience for this presentation, what would make it worth your while to hear it? New information? New ideas? The more thought you give to these questions, the better your presentation will be.
  • If it’s an undeniably dull topic, one of the best things you can do for your audience is to admit it. You’ll often see them visibly relax as a result. You could do this with humour: “I know you’ve all raced from your desks to hear me present on the marvels of correct filing procedures…” or by simply saying: “Trust me – I know this isn’t a very exciting topic, but I’m planning to make this time enjoyable for you.”

Read the rest of this entry »

21
Apr

ppt_slide10

By Ellen Finkelstein

If you’re a trainer or teacher, the title of this blog post is an obvious statement for you.

But if you do more persuasive presentations, it may not be obvious.

All training involves persuasion; my trainer clients taught me that, telling me in no uncertain terms that they need to persuade their trainees to pay attention and implement their training.

Read the rest of this entry »

25
Mar

ppt_slide113

By Priyanka Pereira

Over the last few years, I have seen 3D humanoid vectors being increasingly used in eLearning courses. While I initially thought they were unrealistic, like cartoons, and hence immature and unprofessional, I have now started including them on a regular basis in my storyboards.

So what did it take to convert me?

Read the rest of this entry »

03
Mar

By Carmine Gallo,

ppt_slide43

Don’t blame PowerPoint for a boring presentation. The problem with today’s typical business presentation is NOT PowerPoint. The storyteller is the problem, the presenter who creates wordy, text-heavy slides and uses dull, convoluted jargon and buzzwords.

Read the rest of this entry »