Masteron
15
Jan

Scott Hanselman posted about fixing images that have been distorted in PowerPoint when moving from a 4:3 to to 16:9 aspect ratio. But what if you have many distorted images in your deck. If you manually try to correct those aspect ratios according to the instructions at the link above, you’ll be in for a lot of work.

However, if you aren’t afraid of working with VBA macros then below is a little bit of code that may help. It will reset the aspect ratio for all images in your deck.

—-

Sub SetScaleSizeForAllImages()
Dim s As slide
Dim sh As shape
Dim factor As Single
factor = 1.0
For Each s In ActivePresentation.Slides
    For Each sh In s.Shapes
        If sh.Type = msoPicture Then
            sh.ScaleHeight factor, msoTrue
            sh.ScaleWidth factor, msoTrue
        End If
    Next sh
Next s
End Sub

—-

19
Mar

ppt_slide97

by Brent Dykes

If you work at a company with more than 100 people, you probably have an official corporate PowerPoint template. If you work in a company with more than 1,000 people, you probably don’t know the designer who created your presentation template. There’s a good chance that the graphic designer who created your PowerPoint template doesn’t use PowerPoint on a regular basis — in fact, they probably detest PowerPoint and never touch the presentation software other than to make sure the template looks okay every time the corporate branding is updated.

Does anyone see a problem here? It’s like a Mormon making your coffee or a vegan preparing your hamburger. Too many companies have templates that may look professional aesthetically but are basically impractical for daily use or have bad practices embedded right in them. I’m sure the designers put a lot of thought into the look-and-feel of the PowerPoint templates, but I don’t believe they ever considered doing any usability testing on their actual template designs. That’s too bad because all of their company’s PowerPoint users end up suffering. It forces people like me — who use PowerPoint on a daily and weekly basis — to modify the corporate templates to make them more practical and effective at communicating.

Most of the changes I make to the presentation templates are usually subtle in visual terms, but can save major headaches during the creation and presentation phases. However, most PowerPoint users won’t know how to fix their corporate templates, aren’t going to take matters into their own hands, and are essentially stuck with an impractical or ineffective presentation template.

Read the rest of this entry »

24
Jan

by Ginny Soskey

Seriously, guys — you’d think PowerPoint would be the easiest platform in the world to use. It’s the de-facto presentation software for most businesses, but most of us don’t use the program to its full potential.

There are lots of hidden tricks you can do in the platform. Need an easy way to angle a photo? There’s a button for that. How about removing the background of an image? Simple as a few clicks.

The problem with these little PowerPoint tricks is that they aren’t always easy to discover. This issue becomes even worse because, as a typical Gen Y-er, I hate to read manuals. So, unless I stumble on a new feature or just search for one when it’s absolutely necessary, I never discover those tips and tricks that could make my life much, much easier.

Read the rest of this entry »

13
Jan

 

You can add sound files to your presentations from a variety of sources. For example, you can add sound files you download from the Internet or special sound effects CDs. However, PowerPoint does not recognize all sound file types. WAV and MIDI are two of the types it does recognize.

PowerPoint also lets you attach sounds to different objects on a slide. However, the objects must be animated before you can attach a sound file to them.

Adding sound from a file

  1. If you wish to use a new sound, make sure you download and save the file on your computer, preferably in the same folder with your PowerPoint presentation.
  2. Click on Insert menu < Movies and Sounds < Sound from File
  3. In the Look in drop-down menu, specify the drive and folder where the sound file is located.
  4. In the file list, click the sound file you want, then click OK.
  5. PowerPoint may ask you whether you want the sound to play automatically or on mouse-click. If you choose mouse click, you will need to click the icon during the presentation to start it playing.

Read the rest of this entry »

08
Jan

By Wendy Russell

Slide Numbers are Added to the Footer of the PowerPoint 2010 Presentation

Click on the Slide Numbers button on the Insert tab of the PowerPoint 2010 ribbon

Click on the Slide Numbers button on the Insert tab of the PowerPoint 2010 ribbon

Add Slide Numbers in PowerPoint 2010

It is an easy task to let PowerPoint add the slide numbers automatically to your slides.

  1. Click on the Insert tab of the ribbon.
  2. Click on the Slide Number button, located in the Text section of the ribbon.
  3. The Header and Footer dialog box opens.

Read the rest of this entry »

08
Jan

By Wendy Russell

Activate the PowerPoint Picture Tools and use the Compress Pictures button

Activate the PowerPoint Picture Tools and use the Compress Pictures button

Read the rest of this entry »