human choroinic gonadotropin
12
Feb

by Don Tennant

ppt_slide73

Some would have us believe that PowerPoint is inherently dangerous. No doubt, they make a compelling argument. One need not witness the lifelessness of  more than a handful of moribund meetings, conferences, or classes where PowerPoint is being wielded to recognize that the threat of slaughtered interest and engagement is all too real.

What we need to keep in mind, however, is that it’s only when PowerPoint falls into the wrong hands that it becomes menacing. True, when that happens, the little clicker thing that advances the slides can become a weapon of mass monotony. But when used properly, it can advance engagement, understanding, and knowledge with every click.

In order to gain some insight into the proper handling of PowerPoint, I turned to Vikas Jhingran, a world champion public speaker and author of the book, “Emote: Using Emotions to Make Your Message Memorable.” Jhingran devoted an entire chapter of his book to the topic of how to present with PowerPoint, so I asked him what the keys are to an effective PowerPoint presentation. He explained the two main problems with PowerPoint:

The first is that PowerPoint, in general, is a very difficult tool to engage with emotionally. A lot of people don’t understand that, and therefore lose their audience. So you have to understand that the emotional connection they can have is with you, and then PowerPoint would be an aid that helps in that emotional dialogue. If you make PowerPoint the center of your presentation, then that emotional connection is lost. That is the key reason why we have so many PowerPoint presentations that fail to engage the audience, and fail to be effective.

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17
Jan
by Tom Kuhlmann

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - branding requirements for elearning & PowerPoint

Many organizations have rules on using PowerPoint. But there’s a difference between elearning courses and slide presentations. How you use PowerPoint and its features is different; and so is the output. The only thing that’s the same is the application.

However, it never fails that once someone knows you’re using PowerPoint to build the rapid elearning course, they apply the same rules to your elearning course that they’d apply to presentations. And that causes issues.

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