Masteron
23
Jun

PowerPoint can be a tremendous waste of time. Thinking how each slide should look like, designing it, and formatting it takes countless hours. In some jobs like consulting or marketing, people actually spend more time creating slides than anything else. Most of the time, those users are skilled workers, whose time is both valuable for themselves and expensive for their companies. This is where the Power-user add-in can be a life-saviors. Power-user is a productivity add-in for PowerPoint and Excel, providing dozens of useful features to save time and create better presentations.

01

Power-user gathers on a single tab everything you need to create appealing presentations Power-user provides you with all the content you need to create appealing presentations. 02

For instance, you can start picking up one of the 140 PowerPoint templates and just customize it to match your needs, instead of starting from scratch. Save here your personal favorite slides or your templates from poweredtemplates.com, and you will be able to access them anytime, from any presentation!

03You can also access all the visual resources you need to make your slides look nice. There is a library of icons which you can browse, type keywords and use to enhance your slide messages. Use editable maps to display geographical information. You can also access a library of royalty-free pictures, and create custom diagrams such as value chains or relationship diagrams. Just a couple clicks and your slide looks much nicer!

  On top of that, Power-user provides a great number of tools that will save you hours in manipulating shapes and formatting your presentation. Harmonizing fonts, bullets, colors or titles style in an entire pre   04 Power-user may very well be one of the best product for heavy PowerPoint users. It can be tried for free for a generous 3 months, and it has a free version for students as well. But be careful, once you have tried it, it’s really hard to go back to making slides without it!

15
Jan

Scott Hanselman posted about fixing images that have been distorted in PowerPoint when moving from a 4:3 to to 16:9 aspect ratio. But what if you have many distorted images in your deck. If you manually try to correct those aspect ratios according to the instructions at the link above, you’ll be in for a lot of work.

However, if you aren’t afraid of working with VBA macros then below is a little bit of code that may help. It will reset the aspect ratio for all images in your deck.

—-

Sub SetScaleSizeForAllImages()
Dim s As slide
Dim sh As shape
Dim factor As Single
factor = 1.0
For Each s In ActivePresentation.Slides
    For Each sh In s.Shapes
        If sh.Type = msoPicture Then
            sh.ScaleHeight factor, msoTrue
            sh.ScaleWidth factor, msoTrue
        End If
    Next sh
Next s
End Sub

—-

09
Jun

ppt_slide1[1]

 

Adriaan Bloem

Adriaan BloemSr Mgr Online at MBC

  • Use large fonts. The beamer will probably have a low resolution (you might still come across a 800×600!) and people need to read at a glance. 30 points minimum.
  • Don’t use Serif fonts. (Like Times: the fonts with the small hooks at the ends.) They were designed for legibility and space saving in print. Print is very high resolution, you want to save paper and ink because they cost money. In PowerPoint, paper and ink are free: go for a Sans Serif!
  • To sum it up: 30 points or larger Sans Serif. E.g., Helvetica, Arial, Verdana, Lucida.

des-8-2
…but sometimes, to make an impact, you have to break the rules. Sometimes, much larger, frivolous or very stern fonts can set the tone. Just be very sure why you would break the rules, understand the drawbacks, and please… don’t ever use more than two different fonts!

I have seen presentations in Courier and Mistral where it worked very well. Usually, though, it’s a terrible idea.

If your bullets don’t fit with the 30 point minimum, by the way, that’s a major clue there’s too much text on your slide.

09
Mar

ppt_slide1[1]

by Dave Paradi

Have you ever been at a presentation where you could hardly make out what was on the screen because the presenter used colors that made it hard to tell what was text and what was background? Have you ever done this in one of your presentations?

The choice of colors for presentation slides is one of the important decisions that must be made at the start of the process of developing your slides. Some organizations today dictate a template with corporate colors that must be used for all presentations outside the organization as part of a branding initiative. In that case, you have no choice in the colors. But many internal presentations and in many other organizations you can choose your slide colors. So how do you choose? Here are some ideas to keep in mind when choosing colors for your next set of presentation slides.

Contrast
Webster’s defines contrast as “To set in opposition, or over against, in order to show the differences between”. One of the most common mistakes in selecting colors for presentation slides is to not have enough contrast between the colors chosen for the background and the text or graphics. If you want the audience to see the text or graphics on the screen, they must be in a color that has a high contrast with the background color. This makes the text or graphic appear to float above the background instead of blending into it. In general, this will lead to selecting one of two color schemes – a dark background with light text and graphics or a light background with dark text and graphics. The further apart the colors are the more contrast they will have and the easier it will be for audiences to see the text or graphic you are using.  To ensure that the colors you have selected have enough contrast, use the online Color Contrast Calculator to test the colors using the two international standard tests for color contrast.

Emotional Meaning of Colors
Studies have shown that different colors evoke different general feelings in many people. This can be important when selecting colors for your presentation slides since you will want to avoid colors that will negatively impact the message you are delivering. Here are some common interpretations for colors.
Read the rest of this entry »

17
Mar

by bandertron

ppt_slide8

’ll admit, I’ve created a fair amount of presentations in my time and although i love working with PowerPoint, I’m not what I would call a PowerPoint guru. Not when it comes to the more advanced settings of Microsoft PowerPoint, anyway.

That said, this week i was set the task of trying to help someone with exporting PowerPoint theme colours and I thought I would share my learnings as it turns out, sometimes its not the easiest thing to get your head round.

The particular issue in question here was that when the PowerPoint presentation was being sent over to someone else who was unable to see the theme colours that were present on the original person’s machine.

What follows, are my take aways from this particular occasion:

  • What Are PowerPoint Themes?
  • Where Can I find PowerPoint Themes?
  • How to Customise the Colour Palate in PowerPoint?
  • How to Export and Share PowerPoint Theme Colours? Read the rest of this entry »
27
Feb

By Geetesh Bajaj

Explore various options within the text floatie in Office 2013 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint) on a touch device such as Microsoft Surface.

 

On a touch device such as Micosoft’s Surface tablets, you may not have access to a regular keyboard and mouse. Everything happens with a tap or a slide or some other gesture. To adapt an existing program such as Word, Excel, or PowerPoint for a touch environment is no easy task — however Microsoft has made this happen — and it has happened so well! Unlike the desktop versions of Office programs, the touch versions have a floatie — this is a floating toolbar that contains options that are relevant to the tapped object.

Read the rest of this entry »