human choroinic gonadotropin
14
Apr

ppt_slide1[1]

By Tatiana Estévez

Bullet points are lists of items or short statement points. They are not supposed to be full sentences, at least not when used in PowerPoint. The traditional style of formatting bullet points is to finish each line item with a comma or hyphen, and the last bullet to have a full stop.

My favourite things to do on Quora are:

  • Answering questions;
  • Discussing answers in comments;
  • Writing blog posts; and
  • Collapsing joke answers.

This is considered a bit old fashioned and many companies prefer the style of ‘open punctuation’ for PowerPoint slides. I wouldn’t allow the above in my documents and will take it out if someone tries to do this.

Generally there is no real rule and you can write the above either with full stops or without as long it is consistent:

Oxford Dictionaries says:

Bullet points are used to draw attention to important information within a document so that a reader can identify the key issues and facts quickly. There are no fixed rules about how to use them, but here are some guidelines.

 

 

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07
Apr

This is a guest post from Stacy Ennis. Stacy is a book and magazine editor, writer, book coach, and speaker, as well as the author of The Editor’s Eye: A Practical Guide to Transforming Your Book from Good to Great. She works with a wide range of clients, from celebrities and corporate clients to independent authors and small book presses and also ghostwrites magazine articles, web content, and books, often reaching national and international audiences.

Public speaking and writing seem opposite of one another, yet both are necessary to become a successful author. Nancy Buffington is a public speaking coach who helps authors improve their presence in front of audiences. Here is an interview with Nancy.

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Stacy: Why are public speaking skills important for authors?

Nancy: These days, you can’t afford to be a shy, retiring writer scribbling in the attic. Just to get published, you need to show that you’re willing and more than able to pull off signings, readings, radio and TV interviews. Basically, to be a successful author these days, you need to play a central part on your publicity team.

Stacy: Are there any shared qualities between being a good writer and a good speaker?

Nancy: In both cases, you’re trying to connect with an audience—but when you’re writing, you don’t actually see that audience in front of you. Speaking can make you a much better writer—you get instant feedback from a range of real, live audience members, and you have to be clear (no chance for a live audience to thumb back a few pages if they get lost). Likewise, writing well can make you a better speaker, with a clearer sense of purpose, ideas explored in depth, vivid storytelling, and a structure that really works.

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31
Mar

ppt_slide1[1]

by  Lisa Braithwaite

One cause of speaking anxiety is the feeling (and self-directed pressure) of having to impress the audience.

Maybe this occurs to you while you’re writing, and you start inserting big, formal or flowery (aka “speechy“) words you normally wouldn’t say, but that make you sound smart or important.

Or you’re on stage and — suddenly — it occurs to you that your normal words, actions and movements aren’t good enough.

Suddenly, you don’t know what to do with your hands, even though you were just having a conversation off stage and your hands were fine.

Suddenly, everything is wrong with you. Your clothes aren’t right, your voice isn’t right, your humor isn’t funny enough.

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16
Mar

When designing a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation, there are many different choices to make regarding design elements. One of the first things you have to decide is whether or not to use a template, or to make your design from scratch. Before deciding on whether or not to use a template with PowerPoint, it can be helpful to thoroughly explore all the advantages and disadvantages of using a template

By Lacy Nichols

ppt_slide1[1]
When creating a powerpoint presentation, it is important to decide whether to use a template or to create your own template from scratch.

 

Distinction

  • One problem with using a template for your PowerPoint presentation is that it will probably be a template that has been used many times before. This can result in your presentation not being considered unique, which can be a downfall for certain types of presentations. By designing your own PowerPoint slides, you can be assured that your presentation will stand out from the crowd and won’t be considered boring.

Meeting Deadlines

  • One advantage to using a PowerPoint template is the lack of work involved. If working under an immediate deadline, templates are a viable option. Once a template is selected, all a person needs to do is fill in the blanks with information. This is an easy process as long as there is preparation.

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03
Mar

ppt_slide1[1]

FAIL #1: Using the same deck for in-person presentations and for email

CAYA

Garr Reynolds was one of Steve Jobs’ presentation trainers. On his bookPresentation Zen, he introduces the term presdoc. A presdoc is a hybrid between a presentation and a text document that serves neither purpose well… it has too much text to be a proper presentation, and to few text to be a readable, understandable document.

If you are standing in front of your slides there’s no need to type everything you are about to say. It distracts your audience, because they can’t hear you and read at the same time. If you intend to present, make sure that your slides simply complement and reinforce your point.

You can’t always present in person, in these cases an alternative may be an email-presentation. These decks contain much more data than an actual presentation, but shouldn’t be a replacement to an actual text doc.

A couple rules to keep in mind are:

- Make sure that the font size doesn’t go below 12pts.

- Stick to one idea per slide. More slides is not necessarily bad, as long as you don’t go over 50 or so.

 

The most important thing here is, don’t use the same presentation to email and to present, make (at least) two separate documents. 

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25
Feb

3379

SlideGenius

As all professionals have figured out, the most effective PowerPoint slides are never the ones that contain a smorgasbord of data and information. In fact, the only time slides like these are effective is if you want to put your audience to sleep. The best PowerPoint slides help the presenter tackle a topic with memorable and arresting visuals.

In other words, effective PowerPoint slides should only act as visual aids that help enhance a presenter’s discussion. A PowerPoint presentation isn’t there to act as your script or teleprompter, from which you can simply echo every bit of information flashed on screen. It’s there to make sure your discussion is accessible and easy to understand by turning key points into interesting visuals. Unfortunately, not all presenters have mastered this distinction.

If your presentations are always burdened by text-heavy PowerPoint slides, it’s time to dial back and strip your deck bare. Try the following suggestions to make sure you don’t have walls of text blocking the audience’s interest in your discussion:

Strip your content down to its essentials
Learning to cut back text-heavy PowerPoint slides will really rely on your ability to edit your own content. Before you start making your PowerPoint deck, review the draft you’ve prepared and see how you can simplify your points even more. Your goal is to strip down your content to the bare minimum.

You don’t have to waste space on your slides to elaborate particulars. Your slides are there to highlight the main points and takeaways. Every thing else that needs to be discussed or described is for the presenter to do on his own. Learn more about how you can properly edit your presentation content here.

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16
Feb

11765

By Tatiana Estévez

Bullet points are lists of items or short statement points. They are not supposed to be full sentences, at least not when used in PowerPoint. The traditional style of formatting bullet points is to finish each line item with a comma or hyphen, and the last bullet to have a full stop.

My favourite things to do on Quora are:

  • Answering questions;
  • Discussing answers in comments;
  • Writing blog posts; and
  • Collapsing joke answers.

This is considered a bit old fashioned and many companies prefer the style of ‘open punctuation’ for PowerPoint slides. I wouldn’t allow the above in my documents and will take it out if someone tries to do this.

Generally there is no real rule and you can write the above either with full stops or without as long it is consistent:

Oxford Dictionaries says:

Bullet points are used to draw attention to important information within a document so that a reader can identify the key issues and facts quickly. There are no fixed rules about how to use them, but here are some guidelines.

Source: http://www.oxforddictionaries.co…

Read the rest of this entry »

25
Sep

by Lei Han
My husband shared this video with me and I laughed out loud – “Life after Death by Powerpoint” by Don McMillan. Within 4 minutes, Don talked about some of the most common mistakes we make with our PowerPoint presentations. Here are my favorites.

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23
Jun

ppt_slide1

1. 15 seconds—the amount of time you have to make a positive first impression on your audience.

From the moment you step on stage, your audience will make an assessment of you and then look for evidence to confirm their first impressions. This subconscious phenomena is called thin slicing – and we all do it.  Research shows that the first fifteen seconds of a presentation are the most important because 90% of your audience’s initial judgments remain the same even after you’ve given your presentation.  Knowing this, you want to do everything in your power to make a positive first impression to ensure that initial judgment swing in your favor. How? Dress for success, be prepared, know your audience and don’t forget to smile.

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05
Jun

by PoweredTemplate

Today you have made your mind to impress sophisticated audience giving a knockout presentation. You have spent the night drafting cute wording and selecting your best slides. Now take your time and think: is your presentation really intended for your listeners or it’s just a set of slides? We often use PowerPoint to inform, to persuade, sometimes to provoke. But there can be no better way to absolutely lose the support of your audience than to irritate them. So, how to avoid such a mistake? Let’s ask ourselves a simple question: what drives us nuts when we watch someone giving a presentation?

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