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23
Jun

PowerPoint can be a tremendous waste of time. Thinking how each slide should look like, designing it, and formatting it takes countless hours. In some jobs like consulting or marketing, people actually spend more time creating slides than anything else. Most of the time, those users are skilled workers, whose time is both valuable for themselves and expensive for their companies. This is where the Power-user add-in can be a life-saviors. Power-user is a productivity add-in for PowerPoint and Excel, providing dozens of useful features to save time and create better presentations.

01

Power-user gathers on a single tab everything you need to create appealing presentations Power-user provides you with all the content you need to create appealing presentations. 02

For instance, you can start picking up one of the 140 PowerPoint templates and just customize it to match your needs, instead of starting from scratch. Save here your personal favorite slides or your templates from poweredtemplates.com, and you will be able to access them anytime, from any presentation!

03You can also access all the visual resources you need to make your slides look nice. There is a library of icons which you can browse, type keywords and use to enhance your slide messages. Use editable maps to display geographical information. You can also access a library of royalty-free pictures, and create custom diagrams such as value chains or relationship diagrams. Just a couple clicks and your slide looks much nicer!

  On top of that, Power-user provides a great number of tools that will save you hours in manipulating shapes and formatting your presentation. Harmonizing fonts, bullets, colors or titles style in an entire pre   04 Power-user may very well be one of the best product for heavy PowerPoint users. It can be tried for free for a generous 3 months, and it has a free version for students as well. But be careful, once you have tried it, it’s really hard to go back to making slides without it!

15
Jan

Scott Hanselman posted about fixing images that have been distorted in PowerPoint when moving from a 4:3 to to 16:9 aspect ratio. But what if you have many distorted images in your deck. If you manually try to correct those aspect ratios according to the instructions at the link above, you’ll be in for a lot of work.

However, if you aren’t afraid of working with VBA macros then below is a little bit of code that may help. It will reset the aspect ratio for all images in your deck.

—-

Sub SetScaleSizeForAllImages()
Dim s As slide
Dim sh As shape
Dim factor As Single
factor = 1.0
For Each s In ActivePresentation.Slides
    For Each sh In s.Shapes
        If sh.Type = msoPicture Then
            sh.ScaleHeight factor, msoTrue
            sh.ScaleWidth factor, msoTrue
        End If
    Next sh
Next s
End Sub

—-

09
Jun

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Adriaan Bloem

Adriaan BloemSr Mgr Online at MBC

  • Use large fonts. The beamer will probably have a low resolution (you might still come across a 800×600!) and people need to read at a glance. 30 points minimum.
  • Don’t use Serif fonts. (Like Times: the fonts with the small hooks at the ends.) They were designed for legibility and space saving in print. Print is very high resolution, you want to save paper and ink because they cost money. In PowerPoint, paper and ink are free: go for a Sans Serif!
  • To sum it up: 30 points or larger Sans Serif. E.g., Helvetica, Arial, Verdana, Lucida.

des-8-2
…but sometimes, to make an impact, you have to break the rules. Sometimes, much larger, frivolous or very stern fonts can set the tone. Just be very sure why you would break the rules, understand the drawbacks, and please… don’t ever use more than two different fonts!

I have seen presentations in Courier and Mistral where it worked very well. Usually, though, it’s a terrible idea.

If your bullets don’t fit with the 30 point minimum, by the way, that’s a major clue there’s too much text on your slide.

03
Apr

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by Josephine Roy

As a presentation tool PowerPoint can be used to:


organise and structure your presentation; 
create a professional and consistent format; 
provide an illustrative backdrop for the content of your presentation; 
animate your slides to give them greater visual impact. 

Step 1: Designing PowerPoint slides 

There are a number of features to consider when designing effective PowerPoint slides. The guidelines given below will ensure you create slides that will be easy for your audience to read and understand. 
Using colour 

Be consistent. Ensure that all of your slides have the same or similar background images and colour schemes. PowerPoint’s design templates can be used for this. 
Prepare slides that use a bold colour contrast, e.g. black or deep blue text on a cream background (black and white can be too glaring for the audience). 
Avoid using red or green for text or highlighting as it can be difficult to read. 

Using text 

Avoid using too much text. A useful guideline is the six-by-six rule (slides should have no more than six bullet points and each bullet point should be no more than six words long). 
Create bullet points which are clear summaries of key points. It is not necessary for bullet points to be complete sentences. 
Don’t mix up your fonts and font sizes. Too many variations in font size and type can be visually confusing. 
Ensure that your text is at least 24pt otherwise it may be difficult to read on screen. 
Choose left align for all text to make it easier to read. 
Avoid multiple columns of text on a single slide as they can be difficult to follow on screen. 
Use bold for a clear and simple form of emphasis and headings rather than UPPER CASE, italics or underlining. 
Set clear hierarchies for type size to help your audience distinguish between headings, main text and other types of text. 

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16
Mar

When designing a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation, there are many different choices to make regarding design elements. One of the first things you have to decide is whether or not to use a template, or to make your design from scratch. Before deciding on whether or not to use a template with PowerPoint, it can be helpful to thoroughly explore all the advantages and disadvantages of using a template

By Lacy Nichols

ppt_slide1[1]
When creating a powerpoint presentation, it is important to decide whether to use a template or to create your own template from scratch.

 

Distinction

  • One problem with using a template for your PowerPoint presentation is that it will probably be a template that has been used many times before. This can result in your presentation not being considered unique, which can be a downfall for certain types of presentations. By designing your own PowerPoint slides, you can be assured that your presentation will stand out from the crowd and won’t be considered boring.

Meeting Deadlines

  • One advantage to using a PowerPoint template is the lack of work involved. If working under an immediate deadline, templates are a viable option. Once a template is selected, all a person needs to do is fill in the blanks with information. This is an easy process as long as there is preparation.

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09
Mar

ppt_slide1[1]

by Dave Paradi

Have you ever been at a presentation where you could hardly make out what was on the screen because the presenter used colors that made it hard to tell what was text and what was background? Have you ever done this in one of your presentations?

The choice of colors for presentation slides is one of the important decisions that must be made at the start of the process of developing your slides. Some organizations today dictate a template with corporate colors that must be used for all presentations outside the organization as part of a branding initiative. In that case, you have no choice in the colors. But many internal presentations and in many other organizations you can choose your slide colors. So how do you choose? Here are some ideas to keep in mind when choosing colors for your next set of presentation slides.

Contrast
Webster’s defines contrast as “To set in opposition, or over against, in order to show the differences between”. One of the most common mistakes in selecting colors for presentation slides is to not have enough contrast between the colors chosen for the background and the text or graphics. If you want the audience to see the text or graphics on the screen, they must be in a color that has a high contrast with the background color. This makes the text or graphic appear to float above the background instead of blending into it. In general, this will lead to selecting one of two color schemes – a dark background with light text and graphics or a light background with dark text and graphics. The further apart the colors are the more contrast they will have and the easier it will be for audiences to see the text or graphic you are using.  To ensure that the colors you have selected have enough contrast, use the online Color Contrast Calculator to test the colors using the two international standard tests for color contrast.

Emotional Meaning of Colors
Studies have shown that different colors evoke different general feelings in many people. This can be important when selecting colors for your presentation slides since you will want to avoid colors that will negatively impact the message you are delivering. Here are some common interpretations for colors.
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25
Feb

3379

SlideGenius

As all professionals have figured out, the most effective PowerPoint slides are never the ones that contain a smorgasbord of data and information. In fact, the only time slides like these are effective is if you want to put your audience to sleep. The best PowerPoint slides help the presenter tackle a topic with memorable and arresting visuals.

In other words, effective PowerPoint slides should only act as visual aids that help enhance a presenter’s discussion. A PowerPoint presentation isn’t there to act as your script or teleprompter, from which you can simply echo every bit of information flashed on screen. It’s there to make sure your discussion is accessible and easy to understand by turning key points into interesting visuals. Unfortunately, not all presenters have mastered this distinction.

If your presentations are always burdened by text-heavy PowerPoint slides, it’s time to dial back and strip your deck bare. Try the following suggestions to make sure you don’t have walls of text blocking the audience’s interest in your discussion:

Strip your content down to its essentials
Learning to cut back text-heavy PowerPoint slides will really rely on your ability to edit your own content. Before you start making your PowerPoint deck, review the draft you’ve prepared and see how you can simplify your points even more. Your goal is to strip down your content to the bare minimum.

You don’t have to waste space on your slides to elaborate particulars. Your slides are there to highlight the main points and takeaways. Every thing else that needs to be discussed or described is for the presenter to do on his own. Learn more about how you can properly edit your presentation content here.

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16
Feb

11765

By Tatiana Estévez

Bullet points are lists of items or short statement points. They are not supposed to be full sentences, at least not when used in PowerPoint. The traditional style of formatting bullet points is to finish each line item with a comma or hyphen, and the last bullet to have a full stop.

My favourite things to do on Quora are:

  • Answering questions;
  • Discussing answers in comments;
  • Writing blog posts; and
  • Collapsing joke answers.

This is considered a bit old fashioned and many companies prefer the style of ‘open punctuation’ for PowerPoint slides. I wouldn’t allow the above in my documents and will take it out if someone tries to do this.

Generally there is no real rule and you can write the above either with full stops or without as long it is consistent:

Oxford Dictionaries says:

Bullet points are used to draw attention to important information within a document so that a reader can identify the key issues and facts quickly. There are no fixed rules about how to use them, but here are some guidelines.

Source: http://www.oxforddictionaries.co…

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05
Jun

by PoweredTemplate

Today you have made your mind to impress sophisticated audience giving a knockout presentation. You have spent the night drafting cute wording and selecting your best slides. Now take your time and think: is your presentation really intended for your listeners or it’s just a set of slides? We often use PowerPoint to inform, to persuade, sometimes to provoke. But there can be no better way to absolutely lose the support of your audience than to irritate them. So, how to avoid such a mistake? Let’s ask ourselves a simple question: what drives us nuts when we watch someone giving a presentation?

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25
Mar

ppt_slide113

By Priyanka Pereira

Over the last few years, I have seen 3D humanoid vectors being increasingly used in eLearning courses. While I initially thought they were unrealistic, like cartoons, and hence immature and unprofessional, I have now started including them on a regular basis in my storyboards.

So what did it take to convert me?

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